Dublin team assesses cost aspects of staff shortages
July 1, 2016 -- Under capacity in radiology departments is leading to substantial costs for hospitals because imaging delays significantly prolong in-patient length of stay, but the problem can be solved by hiring more staff to run existing equipment for longer, according to researchers from a leading Irish facility.
Support grows for more rigorous training on dose
June 28, 2016 -- Fresh evidence of the lack of awareness of radiation protection among medical staff in the Middle East has come from a large new study performed in Saudi Arabia. The research has led to renewed calls for more formal training schemes in the region.
Kalender: New CT detectors promise sharper images
June 22, 2016 -- Why has so little happened with CT detector technology in recent years? The short answer is the next big leap forward is a giant one. But exciting new technologies are definitely making their way to commercial systems, according to a keynote lecture given this week on behalf of Willi Kalender, PhD, from Erlangen, Germany.
UKRC: Quality system minimizes PACS errors
June 15, 2016 -- Errors in imaging studies sent to PACS represent a high clinical risk, and an efficient, effective, and safe system needs to be in place to initiate action, delegates heard at last week's U.K. Radiological Congress (UKRC).
Low-dose protocol slashes CT lung screening cancer risk
June 15, 2016 -- How low can low-dose CT (LDCT) lung cancer screening go? Swiss researchers have tested a new protocol for LDCT screening that reduces radiation dose to nearly the level of a chest x-ray -- a reduction that should lower the risk of a patient developing cancer from the scans in the future.
Pressure grows for diagnostic reference levels in Russia
June 14, 2016 -- New research from a large, public hospital in Russia has added fresh impetus to the creation of CT national reference values, and it may also lead to the closer involvement of Russia in international radiation safety initiatives.
Adrian Dixon: Has imaging become too effective?
June 8, 2016 -- LIVERPOOL - There is a real danger that imaging has become a victim of its own success by being too effective, resulting in huge increases in workload, reduced clinical acumen, insufficient number of radiologists and radiographers, and too many sequences and images, warned Dr. Adrian Dixon at the U.K. Radiological Congress.
Paralympians pose special set of imaging challenges
June 7, 2016 -- Paralympic athletes represent a particular challenge for imaging professionals, because they often have underlying physiological or structural abnormalities that take patient management and care to a new level, according to Dr. Rob Campbell, Paralympic imaging lead at the London 2012 Games.
U.K. team shows survival benefits of CT lung screening
June 2, 2016 -- Screening patients at high risk of lung cancer with CT can consistently identify early-stage disease in time for a cure, offering a 73% chance of living five years or more when cancer is detected, concluded an important U.K. pilot study.
How the Olympics transformed Sid's life
June 1, 2016 -- LONDON - When Dr. Sarath Bethapudi ("Sid" to his friends) turned up at the polyclinic for the London Olympics, he soon realized the world's greatest sporting event was not all glitz and glamour. In this video interview, he reflects on his experiences and his number-crunching role at the 2012 games.